TUESDAY 14TH MAY 2019

KEYWORTH.

The garden moth trap is slowly getting worthwhile again after a major lull during last week’s horrid weather. Yesterday morning there were just two Light-brown Apple Moths but today saw the year’s first Pale Tussock, 3rd Waved Umber, 5th Double-striped Pug and 50th Shuttle-shaped Dart.

Double-striped Pug
Pale Tussock

GREAT CENTRAL RAILWAY.

Grizzled Skipper

Barnston Cutting south of the A6006 has been managed by Butterfly Conservation and Notts BAP volunteers for the Grizzled Skipper population and I’m pleased to say that their efforts (including mine occasionally) are paying off as I reckon I saw about ten over a 500 metre stretch.

There were also a few Brown Argus and a Treble-bar moth.

Treble-bar

There is also a terrific variety of plants to be found here with at least two “species” of Hawkweed as well as Field Scabious, Rustyback, Common Cornsalad and a Polypody to name a few that spring to mind

Rustyback

The Rustyback is a new site for Nottinghamshire.

MONDAY 1ST APRIL 2019

COTGRAVE FOREST.

I nabbed the only day of the week, if the weather forecast proves to be correct when a butterfly might be active though with a maximum temperature of about 12°C, I wasn’t optimistic. This is the first day of the first week of the Butterfly Conservation transect season and despite the chill, the sunshine brought out two Commas and ten Small Tortoiseshells making it worthwhile.

KEYWORTH.

Meanwhile, the garden moth trap has had a steady trickle of early season moths during the latter part of March with the month attracting totals of 23 Hebrew Character, 54 Common Quaker, 40 Small Quaker, 3 Early Grey, 15 Clouded Drab, 5 Early Moth, 16 Emmelina monodactyla, 2 Twenty Plume, 1 Brindled Beauty, 1 Epiphyas postvittana and 1 Pine Beauty.

Pine Beauty